Sweet Crab, Chilli and Kale Stir Fry

The lovely folks from Debenhams sent over a delightful stash of Asian-themed cooking utensils last week! Oh the joy – especially for an Asianophile such as me.

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These wondrous collection of gadgets (more about these at the end of my post) inspired me to make a seasonal stir-fry with a Japanese twist. The three things which give this dish it’s defining flavour is the combination of crab and chilli and the Japanese stock seasoning called Mizkan Oigatsuo Tsuyu Bonito which is used in both soups and stir fries to give the stir fry an ultra light sauce that holds the stir-fry together, whilst giving it a lovely foundation of flavour. I also added mirin to give the dish a slight sweet edge – I love the combination of crab, chilli and sweet notes!

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As many of you will know, I love to use local and seasonal produce where I can so here I’ve used local Cromer crab, although you can use any variety, fresh chilli and locally grown kale, spring onions and even the mushrooms, although not indigenous to the UK, are actually grown here now too. Both pak choi, kale and spring onions are all in season this February, so make the most of these tasty veggies.

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Sweet Crab, Chilli and Kale Stir Fry – Made using soba noodles

I tried using soba buckwheat noodles initially which turned out delicious but I preferred the outcome with the ‘meatier’ udon noodle – that’s just a personal preference.

Sweet Crab, Chilli and Kale Japanese Stir Fry

1 x large dressed Cromer crab

450g of cooked Soba buckwheat or Udon noodles

2 large handfuls of chopped kale

2 x roughly chopped pak choi

1 x finely sliced shallot

1 x spriralized courgette

2 handfuls of chopped mushrooms

1 x bunch of spring onions, finely sliced into strips

3 cloves of crushed garlic

1 x finely chopped red chilli

3 tbs mizkan oigatsuo tsuyu bonito (soup base)

1 tbs mirin

1 tbs flavourless cooking oil (rapeseed, vegetable, sunflower)

Method:

  1. On a high heat, add some oil and then add the shallot and spring onions. Fry for three minutes before adding the chilli and garlic.
  2. After a couple of minutes add your pak choi, kale, mushrooms. Fry until almost al dente.
  3. Then add your noodles and courgette – because this is such a soft vegetable, when spiralized it only takes moments to cook. After a minute or so add your noodles. Cook for a further minute making sure you move the vegetables and noodles around the pan during cooking then add your soup stock base, mirin and all the crab – both the white and dark meat.
  4. Give a final cook for a couple of minutes or until the crab is warm and is coating the noodles.
  5. Serve with a sprinkle of thinly sliced red chillies for an extra kick.

Oxo Gadgets

I was really surprised to learn that there’s a range called Oxo, stocked by Debenhams. I had a quick gander online and they have a colossal range of gadgets and kitchen accessories. I was mightily impressed by the quality and price.

I haven’t reviewed each of the Oxo products individually in this post (but I will feature them in future posts as and when) so for now, just a note on two products in particular – the real game changers!

The hand-held spiralizer: I’ve been meaning to invest in a spiralizer for some time but I’ve questioned whether I’d use it enough or where I’d store it. Problem now solved because this handheld version is actually pretty brilliant – it’s easy to use and wash and it’s compact. And the outcome is super healthy!

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The Ken Hom Performance Wok 32cm. I’ve had various woks in the past but this is seriously the Bentley of woks. The food glides around easily as the wok’s breath coats the food. It’s a really good size and can make a stir-fry for four easily – usually a tricky challenge in even the best of frying pans. The ingredients seemed to cook very quickly, evenly and didn’t burn around the edges or stick like it sometimes can. Massive top marks for this!

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Gadgets supplied by Debenhams. All opinions expressed in this post are my own.

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